Monday, February 3, 2020

Reading Preferences by Karen Whiddon

I can't believe it's February already.  2020 has already zipped onward, despite the fact that I've been sick the entire year (and ended 2019 sick, boo.)  I started a new book for Harlequin Romantic Suspense and have been enjoying writing it, especially since it's set in an imaginary west Texas town like the two books preceding it.

In addition to writing, I've been listening to music and I've been reading.

These days, there's so much filling my time that I actually have to allot time for reading.  I got a  brand new Kindle Paperwhite for Christmas (my old one, a first generation, finally bit the dust.)  I've got a bunch of books on there that I'm dying to read, and I'm slowly making my way through them.  Mostly fiction, though a few are non-fiction.  One of my favorite ways to spend a winter day is curled up by the fire with a good book and a cup of hot tea, cocoa, or coffee.



What about you?  Do you read on an e-reader or prefer paper books?  My daughter, who is a teacher, only reads paper books.  I still buy a few in paperback or hardcover, but mostly I tend to read on my Kindle.  My Harlequin Romantic Suspense books sell way more in paperback than they do in e-books, but all my rights-reverted-backlist books are only in E-book.

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13 comments:

  1. I use a Kindle for most books, but I still buy hardback and paperback. It depends on where I am when I want to get a book. It's so dangerous that we can buy books with just one click. YIKES!

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  2. I love my Paperwhite!! The battery lasts so long and I can change the font size for my poor old eyes. Print books are nice, but I can fit hundreds of books on my Paperwhite and carry them around and it's far lighter and smaller than a print book. So convenient!

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  3. I still prefer a real book, especially on vacation at the beach and pool. Because I'm writing and revising on a screen all day, it's hard to read on a screen. I want to edit
    I have books on my kindle ap on my tablet to read at the gym, but I'm sure a dedicated reader is much nicer.

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  4. I always swore by paperbacks and hardback books, happiest with paper in hand. Then I discovered the ease and quick access to e-books when I judged a writer's contest. Now, I have a mix of both, depending on the circumstance. Research books and beach reads? Always an actual paper book! But, let's face it, our Gem's flash sales and deals are TOO GOOD to be ignored! Now I just need more time to read for pleasure. *sigh*

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  5. I have a format for all occasions, lol. Audiobooks for the car (and grocery shopping), paperback (or hard cover) for bedside, and ebooks for travel. xo

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  6. I usually buy in print when the ebook is almost the same price or more. I also go to the library and take out print books. So although I read ebooks, they're mainly when I'm searching for something to read or a deal flashes on my screen. Can't resist those.

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  7. I read primarily on my phone, but since it's so bad for my eyes, I'm trying to go back to using my Nook or reading paperbacks.

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  8. I still buy print books, but mostly nonfiction reference books. For reading fiction, I prefer a Kindle. It doesn't "wash out" in bright sunlight plus it's got the built-in illumination for nighttime reading. I've got the Voyager now since I had to replace my first gen Kindle last year.

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  9. I still use my Paperwhite circa 2013. Love it! What I don’t love is the fact that I never even browse paperbacks anymore.

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  10. I still prefer paper but acknowledge the advantages of e-books, too. I buy non-fiction in paper as I love to have my research books on a shelf where I can see and access them easily. For traveling, e-books certainly are convenient as you carry your library with you.

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  11. Hard copy only. Here's why I don't like e-readers. Least of which is, theft. Battery death. Scarcity and toxicity of materials needed to make. Eye strain. Headaches. For some posture issues. Especially in the young. Easily distracted, so harder to remember what you read. and often you do not really own your ebook. A big retailer can take it back any time. If a student, there is suggestive evidence that longhand notes may have superior external storage as well as superior encoding functions.

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  12. I think I'm about 50/50. I get a lot of books from the library but some books (like from the Gems) are only available in e-book format. My tablet with the Kindle app is so convenient to take when traveling.

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  13. I read fiction on my Kindle (usually in bed at night), but I prefer any reference or cookbooks in print. The reason is I have arthritis and can't hold a book for any length of time and more. Love my Kindle.

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