Tuesday, January 14, 2020

Dream a little dream... by Liz Flaherty #RomanceGems

When I worked at the post office, and even after I retired, I often dreamed about work. It didn't bother me--my job was an important part of my life; I also dreamed about my husband, my kids, and the seven perfect grandchildren who took over great chunks of my heart.

But I never dreamed about writing, even at the most exhilarating times (new contract, new release), the most frustrating ones (no to a proposal, abysmal royalties), or even the most anticipatory times, such as the week before going to a conference (when I had nothing to wear, was fat, and knew no one would want to talk to me).

Then last night happened. When throughout the dream, I was not myself. I was an annoyed teenager whose mother was intent on running--and ruining!--my life. I didn't recognize anyone in the dream, but it took place in my house. At the end--I don't have cool dreams I remember in their entirety--I was standing in front of the TV, bound and determined that regardless of what my mother had said, I was going to watch the end of the show that was on. It was an episode of Tales of Wells Fargo.

I have no idea what that dream meant, but I've decided I'm going to pretend it was about writing simply because it made me wonder some things.

  1. When you're writing, do you become the person in whose head you're residing, or are you still very much the narrator even though we all know better than to use omniscient POV? 
  2. Are there rules--like the aforementioned POV one--that you'd like to break just because you like them in prose even if it seems no one else does?
  3. Do you think our stories come from our dreams even if we don't remember them?
  4. To the writers AND the readers, do you like dream scenes in books?
  5. Do you have recurring dreams?
I have some goody bags left from Christmastime. I'll send one of these out to a commenter who answers any of these questions. And, while you're here, don't forget the January giveaway! Thanks for visiting. 

Click here for the Giveaway
***
Available for pre-order now! Only $1.99 for eight brand new stories from Christmas Town, Maine--just in time for Valentine's Day. 

18 comments:

  1. I would say my dreams come from my daydreaming. What I've written often shows up in my dreams--so I reverse dream. Love your new cover!!!

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  2. My very first book came from a dream. Or at least the first scene did and then I stayed in bed trying to figure out why these people were doing what they were doing. The rest just flowed.
    And yes, I always get inside the skin of my characters as I'm writing them. I think that's essential to really showing what they're thinking and feeling.

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    1. I always thought I did, too, but that dream made me wonder. I'm still wondering. :-)

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  3. I dream about stories in that half awake state before full consciousness. And, yes, sometimes when in full creative mode I become the character, But that’s on a good day and they can be far apart. Nora’s right about the cover!

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    1. Thanks, Bonnie. I love those half-conscious thoughts. I wish I could hang onto them more often!

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  4. That Valentine's book looks awesome! Will grab a copy. My dreams never make sense or have anything useful.

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    1. Oh, thank goodness I'm not the only one! Thanks, Kathleen.

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  5. Writer Taylor Caldwell is supposed to have said that all of her books came from dreams. Not mine. I dream stupid stuff that carries no particular meaning or message. I don't like dream scenes in a book or movie. I usually become the character in whose POV I'm writing. Love the cover of the Valentine book. Ordered my copy.

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    1. Taylor Caldwell's books were so dark and dreary. I can't imagine her dreamlife. Her view of human behaviour was depressing and I had to quit reading her work.

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    2. Thanks, Caroline. I don't care much for dream sequences, either, although I've read them done very well. I don't usually like them in movies, either.

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  6. I had to go look. I haven't read Taylor Caldwell at all, and I think I might keep it that way.

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  7. When writing, you have to remain the narrator. You have to be in charge of the thoughts and the words. If you don't separate the two, even if you're writing about yourself, you won't think of the story in the reader's eyes.

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  8. Dreams are often the bane of my existence bcz I have night terrors. But I also have my friends and family members that have passed away dream walk through my dreams. This can some times be cool but often times this can be disturbing when you're trying to move on and let go. So whether I'm having dream walking or night terrors going on, I'm often exhausted when I wake up!

    Msredk at aol dot com

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    1. Night terrors are awful, aren't they? One of my kids had them.

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  9. I've actually had dreams that inspired stories I've written. I'll often say to my husband, "I had the weirdest dream last night." To which he replies, with an eye roll, "All your dreams are weird." He's right. *G* They usually are.

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